Scams Awareness Week 2020 quiz - text-only version

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Be yourself, don't let a scammer be you.

Scams Awareness Week

#ScamsWeek2020

Can you spot the scam?

Scammers have lots of tricks to steal your personal information to use for their own gain. Knowing what to look out for is an important way to protect yourself and your identity.

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You receive this email from myGov asking you to verify your identity. What would you do?

From: Australia Government <no-reply@aussie.com>
Subject: Australian Government and myGov must verify your identity
Reply to: no-reply@aussie.com

Australian Government logo

myGov logo

Please DO NOT REPLY by email as this mailbox is not monitored.

This is a message from the myGov team.

Australian Government and myGov must verify your identity - (Part 4.2, paragraph 4.3.13 of the AML/CTF Rules).

Click to go to myGov and proceed with verification.

Thank you

Message reference: UE018

Answers

Click the link – it looks like it's from a legitimate source.

Delete the email – it's a scam.

Correct answer: Delete the email – it's a scam.

The Australian Government will never ask you to follow a link in an email or SMS to verify your identity. Another sign that this is a scam is the sender’s email address no-reply@aussie.com. All government agency addresses end in .gov.au.

Another way to check is to hover over the link and see where the address takes you – in this case not a government website.

You find a social media ad for a puppy with a link to a professional-looking website. The seller is remote but they are selling puppies for $1250 including transport – much cheaper than you've seen elsewhere. They are very thorough and want to check you're a good prospective owner, so have asked for a deposit and a lot of information including a copy of your photo ID before they can agree to the sale. What would you do next?

Answers

Transfer the money straight away to secure the puppy – at this price, they're bound to go quickly.

Check testimonials on the seller's website before buying.

Provide the information they've asked for – they're thorough and you want to prove you'd make a good owner.

Google the seller to look for independent reviews.

Correct answer: Google the seller to look for independent reviews.

There are red flags in this scenario – the cheap price, the inability to visit the puppy and their request for your identity documents.

Genuine breeders may ask questions about your living situation to asses your suitability for the pet, but they don't need personal documents!

Never send money or give credit card details, online account details or copies of personal documents to anyone you don’t know or trust.

Which of the following are signs that your online love interest is a fake?

Answers

They tell you that they love you very quickly.

They're working overseas and an emergency has occurred and they need money.

They want to send you a parcel and ask for a copy of your driver's license, your full legal name and your date of birth for paperwork.

All of the above.

Correct answer: All of the above.

Dating and romance scammers often use various common tactics to trick you out of your money and personal information.

If they ask for money, a loan, your banking details, personal identifying information about you or copies of your documents, or ask you to invest in a company they recommend – just say no. These are signs that you may be dealing with a scammer.

Your boss sends you this email – what should you do?

Friday 17/08/20 2.18 pm
Doe, John <john@servíces.com>
URGENT: gift cards needed ASAP for clients

To: Sandra@services.com

Hi Sandra

Are you busy? I'm in a meeting for most of the day and forgot I need some gift cards for a big client meeting tomorrow. Can you buy ten $100 gift cards for me ASAP and let me know when you have them?

Email is the best way of contacting me at the moment.

Thanks,

John Doe

The Services Company
Chief Executive Officer
Email: john.doe@services.com

Answers

Buy the gift cards – you don't want to make your boss angry.

Ignore the email and contact IT security – this is not your boss.

Correct answer: Ignore the email and contact IT security – this is not your boss.

The sender’s address is different from your manager’s email address – look very carefully at the ‘i’ in services in the sender's email. This is a scam.

Let your manager and IT team know there has been a scam attempt (check with them first before forwarding the email).

You receive a call from someone claiming to be from an IT company. They say there's a problem with your internet and persuade you to give them access to your computer and online banking. You find out they depleted your bank account – what is this scam called?

Answers

Hacking

Remote access scam

'Nigerian' scam

False billing scam

Correct answer: Remote access scam

Scammers will often call pretending to be well-known IT or telco providers and claim there is something wrong with your computer and request remote access to fix the problem.

There is usually no problem with your computer and you should never provide remote access to anyone that that you don’t know and trust – even if they claim to be from a well-known organisation.

You get an SMS saying your delivery has arrived but you need to pay a $1.99 fee to release the package. You clicked the link and entered your credit card and other details, and later realised it was a scam. What do you do?

Your parcel couldn't be delivered. Follow the link below to pay the $1.99 holding fee to release your package aussiepost@yandex.com

Answers

Call your bank immediately to either cancel your credit card or see if the payment can be stopped.

Shrug it off – it was only a $1.99 charge anyway.

Correct answer: Call your bank immediately to either cancel your credit card or see if the payment can be stopped.

If you think you have provided bank or credit card details to a scammer contact your bank as soon as possible. They may be able to stop the payment or at least block more payments from going through.

A small initial charge may not be the end of the scam – the scammer can charge much more to your credit card.

You receive a letter in the mail advising you have been pre-approved for a credit card, but you don’t need one. You decide to throw away the letter. What should you do first?

Answers

Shred or destroy the letter before putting it in the rubbish.

Throw the letter away as is.

Put the letter back in the envelope and write 'personal' on it before throwing it in the rubbish.

Correct answer: Shred or destroy the letter before putting it in the rubbish.

Scammers can go through mailboxes and rubbish bins to find personal information they may be able to use to steal your money and/or identity. Make sure you destroy anything with personal information before throwing it away.

And don't forget to lock your mailbox!

If you think your identity has been compromised, who should you contact first?

Answers

The police

Scamwatch

Your financial institution

Your insurance company

Correct answer: Your financial institution

You should contact your financial institution first and then the other agencies if applicable.

For more support and information on the process of restoring your identity if it has been compromised you can contact IDCARE at idcare.org or call 1800 595 160.

0 to 4 correct answers: Don't let a scammer be you

This is Not Your life
Celebrating the masters of identity theft

Be yourself
don't let a scammer be you

"These days we only need to get a few personal details in order to steal your whole identity." Identity theft scammer

#ScamsWeek2020 Scams Awareness Week

Your personal information is valuable. You have a lot to lose – and not only money. Once lost, it can take years to recover your identity. But there are some simple ways you can protect yourself.

Our new parody podcast from the makers of The Checkout and The Chaser is packed with red flags to watch out for and tips on what (and what not) to do.

Listen now

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5 to 8 correct answers: Be yourself

This is Not Your life
Celebrating the masters of identity theft

Be yourself
don't let a scammer be you

"It's not: 'Your money or your life.' We get both." Identity theft scammer

#ScamsWeek2020 Scams Awareness Week

Well done! You are wise to the ways scammers can try to trick you into sharing your personal information. You know your personal information is valuable. It's not only money you could lose. Once lost, your identity can take years to recover.

Our new parody podcast from the makers of The Checkout and The Chaser is packed with entertaining tips for savvy scam spotters like you!

Listen now

Share your results

Facebook logo Twitter logo