Rebate scams

Rebate scams try to convince you that you are entitled to a rebate or reimbursement from the government, a bank or trusted organisation.

How this scam works

The scammer approaches you with a false claim that you are entitled to a reimbursement or rebate, such as for overpaid taxes, bank fees or some sort of compensation. The contact may come by mail, telephone, email, text message or social media.

They will pretend to be from the government, a bank or trusted organisation, and will ask you to make a small initial payment to cover 'administration fees' or taxes, in order to claim the amount owed to you.

If you hand over your money, you will lose it and not receive any rebate. If you provide your credit card or banking details, you may find that more is taken out than expected.

Warning signs

  • You receive a contact out of the blue that claims you are eligible for a rebate.
  • The caller or sender pretends to be from a government department, financial institution or trusted organisation.
  • In order to receive your money, you are asked to pay an upfront fee to cover 'administration fees' or taxes.
  • The scammer will typically ask you to send the money via a money transfer service.
  • You may also be asked to provide personal or financial details.

Protect yourself

  • Verify the identity of the contact by calling the relevant organisation directly – find them through an independent source such as a phone book or online search. Do not use the contact details provided in the message sent to you.
  • Do an internet search using the names or exact wording of the letter/email to check for any references to a scam – many scams can be identified this way.
  • Remember, government departments or trusted companies will never contact you asking you to pay money upfront in order to claim a fee or rebate.
  • Scammers will often ask you to use an unusual payment method, including preloaded debit cards, gift cards, iTunes cards or electronic currency such as Bitcoin.

  • If you think it's a scam, don't respond — scammers will use a personal touch to play on your emotions to get what they want.
  • Never send money or give credit card details, online account details or copies of personal documents to anyone you don’t know or trust and never by email.
  • Avoid any arrangement with a stranger that asks for up-front payment via money order, wire transfer, international funds transfer, pre-loaded cards or electronic currency. It is rare to recover money sent this way.
  • Protect your identity — your personal details are private and invaluable; keep them away from scammers. For example, don’t complete online forms attached to the rebate offer.

Have you been scammed?

If you think you have provided your bank account or credit card details to a scammer, contact your bank or financial institution immediately.

If you think you have given out other personal information, please see our advice on where to get help.

We encourage you to report scams to the ACCC via the report a scam page. This helps us to warn people about current scams, monitor trends and disrupt scams where possible. Please include details of the scam contact you received, for example, email or screenshot.

We also provide guidance on protecting yourself from scams.

Spread the word to your friends and family to protect them.

More information

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